South County Hospital

Research confirms significant benefits of Mako

Just as technology makes a real difference in our day-to-day lives, it is doing the same in medicine. 

The Mako system combines the highly developed technology of an interactive 3-D visualization system and the RIO® robotic arm. Together, these components provide the surgeon with the consistent ability to prepare bone surfaces with pinpoint accuracy and to position implants at the optimal angle.

The Mako system combines the highly developed technology of an interactive 3-D visualization system and the RIOrobotic arm. Together, these components provide the surgeon with the consistent ability to prepare bone surfaces with pinpoint accuracy and to position implants at the optimal angle.

Numbers Tell the Story

Recently released clinical research data confirms what many orthopedic surgeons recognized early on.

 

            This chart clearly demonstrates the accuracy of total hip replacement surgery using
            the robot-guided system. The square represents the "sweet" spot where implant placement
            is ideal. The blue dots show the results of Makoplasty surgery, while the green dots show
            the results of manual placement.

 

Mako offers significant improvement in patient outcome for total hip replacement and for knee resurfacing because of the technology. These improved outcomes result from superior implant positioning, which directly affects patient mobility, implant longevity, and patient satisfaction. The studies compared Mako with “manual” surgeries at a number of highly-regarded U.S. hospitals, performed by some of the most respected orthopedic surgeons in the country.

A long-term study, in which leading orthopedic surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital participated, showed that optimal cup positioning in manually performed total hip replacement surgery was achieved in only 47 percent of cases. This compares to 96 percent in Mako assisted total hip replacement surgery (other studies show rates of 100 percent), as determined by 2-dimensional X-rays. (Optimal cup positioning has been determined to be a 30° to 45° inclination and 5° to 25° version.)

For partial knee replacement, studies looked at patients 2 years after surgery, which is when accurate data on revision rates can be determined. The results: patients who had undergone Mako knee resurfacing showed a rate of only 0.4 percent revision, which compares with a rate of between 4 percent to more than 6 percent in manually performed partial knee replacement. Also, comparing Mako knee patients in which both compartments of the knee had been replaced, with traditional total knee replacement patients, studies showed that Mako patients had greater range of motion, greater quad strength, and higher functional activity at 2, 4, and 6-weeks after surgery.      

How it works

To understand how the Mako system provides superior outcomes in total hip replacement surgery, it’s essential to understand how the joint works. In the hip, a “cup” (acetabulum) holds the ball (femoral head) of the joint. In total hip replacement surgery, the acetabulum is fitted with a cup implant to accommodate the new femoral head implant. Proper positioning of this cup is to the quality of the outcome; when the cup is not positioned at the optimal angle for the patient’s anatomy, a number of problems can occur: dislocation of the joint, leg length discrepancy, discomfort when walking, and a shortened implant life.   

With knee resurfacing, the Mako system is providing superior outcomes for similar reasons. But in addition to allowing the surgeon to remove only the diseased bone and to position the implants optimally, the technology makes partial knee replacement—a procedure many orthopedic surgeons have shied away from because of the complexity of performing it manually—much more accessible. This accessibility means that perhaps more than half of patients who have been advised to have a total knee replacement but would be better served by partial knee surgery, can reap the benefits. And because partial knee replacement leaves the patient’s ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) and PCL (posterior cruciate ligament) intact, post-surgical mobility is improved, and patients report a more “natural feeling” knee and gait. 

While every surgeon is dedicated to achieving the best results possible, without the assistance of this technology it’s just not possible, as the data clearly shows.  Mako allows unprecedented consistent accuracy in hip and knee surgery. 

South County Hospital: Ahead of the Curve

The physicians of Ortho Rhode Island--South County Orthopedics & PT (part of the South County Hospital Orthopedics Center) immediately recognized the advantages the Mako system offered. They became the first Mako-certified surgeons in Rhode Island and in New England to do so. To date, they have performed well over 5,000 Mako surgeries, more than anyone in the world. For more information, call the South County Orthopedic Center at 401 788-1700. To schedule a consultation with one of the Mako-certified surgeons, call 401 789-1422.